NON PHARMACOLOGICAL THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S

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.INDEX PROFESSORS
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Howard Feldman, MD FRCP (C)

 

 

Howard Feldman, MD, is Professor of Neurology at the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, Canada with appointments as Adjunct Professor at the McGill Centre for Studies in Aging in Montreal and Yale University in New Haven. In 2009, he was granted a leave from UBC to take up the position of Vice President and Therapeutic Area Head Neurosciences Global Clinical Research at Bristol-Myers Squibb where he is currently working.   

In his research career, Dr. Feldman has been active in epidemiological and clinical diagnostic/therapeutic studies in both mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). He has been Principal Investigator on a number of large international clinical trials with novel therapies for AD and has had a strong focus on clinical trials methodology and the characterization of the longitudinal course of the dementias. His contributions to the dementia field also include key scientific discoveries in the area of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) where he was involved in the discovery of the progranulin gene causing FTD as well as the identification of TDP as a constitutional protein in this disorder. These discoveries have been published in Science and Nature in 2006.
 
Dr. Feldman has published more than 120 peer-reviewed papers and over 300 publications including a text in 2007 entitled the Atlas of Alzheimer’s Disease. One of his papers (in Lancet Neurology) was the most downloaded in the journal Science Direct in 2003 and he was featured in a Profile in Lancet Neurology in 2007. He has achieved consistent peer-reviewed funding for his research from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Alzheimer Society of Canada, and the National Institutes of Health. He has lectured globally and has received numerous awards recognizing his research contributions. He has achieved consistent peer-reviewed funding for his research from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Alzheimer Society of Canada, and the National Institutes of Health.