NON PHARMACOLOGICAL THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S

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Linda Teri Ph.D.

 

 

Linda Teri, PhD, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychosocial and Community Health at the University of Washington (UW) School of Nursing in Seattle. Dr. Teri also serves as Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at UW School of Medicine and the Department of Psychology at UW.

An avid clinician, researcher, educator, and scholar, Dr. Teri was awarded the Alzheimer’s Association Pioneer Award for her groundbreaking work in psychosocial treatments to reduce behavioral problems in persons with dementia.  She is also recipient of the Gerontological Society of America’s most prestigious Lawton Award for “a significant contribution in gerontology that has led to an innovation in gerontological treatment, practice or service,  that improves the lives of older persons.”

Dr. Teri has been an investigator on significant externally funded studies. She is currently Principle Investigator on three federally funded grants investigating nonpharmacological treatments for dementia and methods for enhancing healthy aging.  She is also co-investigator on a number of others designed to further understand and/or treat the behavioral problems common to dementing diseases. A national and international speaker, Dr. Teri has published over 200 papers that have appeared in JAMA, Neurology, JAGS, and Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, among other leading journals.

Dr. Teri embodies the scientist-practitioner model of research and clinical care.  She was Director and Chief Psychologist of the U.W. Geriatric and Family Services Clinic for almost twenty years, during which time she worked directly with older adults, their families, and concerned health care providers.  She continues this work today, expanding to training and consulting with staff in Assisted Living Residences to improve their care of older adults with dementia.

Dr. Teri founded the U. Washington’s School of Nursing’s deTornyay Center for Healthy Aging and served as Director of that Center for five years.  She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Gerontological Society of America.  She serves on Editorial Boards of numerous journals, including J. Gerontology, JAGS, Aging and Mental Health and Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice.